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How to get there? 

Best time to visit? 

Getting around Singha Park? 

What you might experience? 

TIPS?! 

Address:

99 Moo 1, Mae Korn, Amphoe Chiang Rai, Chaing Rai, Thailand 57000

Operating Hours:

Daily 09 00 – 18 00
Entrance Fee:

FOC; but you do need to pay for other activities you would like to engage in

(e.g. zip lining or wall climbing etc.)

Recommended length of visit:

~ half to a full day

(depending on how intense you want to immerse yourself)

I was blown right away by the picturesque sight I got when we first arrived at Singha Park. Singha Park is the largest agricultural tourism destination in Thailand. Located 450 metres above sea level, and with hectares of fertile soil, this park just blooms beautiful flora all year round!

There is so much to do at Singha Park, from just mere strolling and enjoying solace, to having an awesome bike ride through the tea plantations and lakes to even zip lining and wall climb, and of course, good old fashion chilling at a quaint café enjoying a nice cuppa or two!

Singha Park, owned by Boon Rawd Brewery (the company that manufactures Singha Beer), thus the name Singha Park, would disappoint any visitor who thinks that he/she would find breweries after breweries and endless supply of Singha Beer. This park in the countryside is a family-friendly establishment that really has more hectares of land for tea plantation beyond the horizon than beer supply.

Opened to the general public in 2012, Singha Park was previously known as Boon Rawd Farm. The rich fertile soil that sprawled was once used to grow barley for the beer production. Currently, some areas of Singha Park are left for the original barley fields, but most large land are now for orchards and tea plantations.

 

How to get there?

Car

Since we had the rented car, getting there was pretty simple and so straightforward; with the help of Google Maps of course! We stayed at The Imperial River House Resort in Chiang Rai, quite centrally located I would say.

From the resort, it was approximately a 30 minutes’ drive to Singha Park. You know you have arrived when you see the huge iconic landmark of the Singha mascot!

Tuk- Tuk/ Taxis

Not renting a car? Then the tuk-tuk or the taxi are probably the next most convenient alternative! I am sure you can haggle over the price with them too. But I suggest a rented car or even a motorcycle is still imperatively more convenient.

 

Best time to visit?

Singha Park is open all year round, but visiting the park at the end or early start of the year would render you with much more special memories! Here are 2 reasons why!

1. Cool Season

Firstly, the cool season in Chiang Rai is between November and January. With Mother Nature on your side warding off the sultry humidity, it makes every activity you do so much more bearable right?

Minus the heavy downpour during our first visit to the park and had to seek refuge at a restaurant to have lunch and tea whilst waiting for the rain to subside, the weather was really inundatedly perfect on the second visit. Though a little melancholic and drizzly at intervals, it was cool and breezy; just perfect for strolls and explorations!

2. Singha Park’s Organised Events

When we were there, organisers were setting up for Farm Festival On The Hill. Alas, we were scheduled to leave, if not, we would probably jump at the opportunity for an experience! This annual Farm Fest is the largest music fest in the North of Thailand; with leading music artists all across Thailand coming together and jamming.

Yeah sure it’s not Coachella, but hey we can always embark on new experiences at least once right? Sure I would totally not understand Thai lyrics, but I would probably still enjoy the positive ambience flowing!

And not to mention the International Balloon Fiesta? If I could travel during the period Singha Park was organising the event (14 – 18 February 2017), I would totally go for it. This annual event is a hot air balloon festival and international hot air balloon race. It is also a food fest and a concert by Thai artists. It is basically a whole package of joy where we could get to see an array of colourful giant balloons float up to the sky. I can only imagine a picture-perfect moment!

So if you want to have the full experience at Singha Park, I suggest you click here for more updated details on their upcoming events!

 

Getting around Singha Park?

Walk

Your legs can take you far but frankly not far enough. To rely on your legs to walk close to the entire park would be a little insane, right?

But that was apparently what we did. We must be crazy at that point in time. I recalled towards the end of the day, we were quite tired and we were sort of lost. Haha! We were to tempted to just hitch a ride out to the entrance.

Now the reason why we didn’t rent a bicycle at the entrance was because we knew that  we would spend a long time in the park. We also knew that we wanted to chill for lunch and all that jazz. You know, just have a chill lazy day at the park.

And knowing the fact that we had to return the bikes where we rented from and not return it at another rental bike shop inside the park, we weren’t really sure it was a good idea to rent the bike at the entrance. Since we wanted to explore more deeper into the smaller roads and not solely on the bike trials, we decided to just walk.

Well, with hindsight, if I would redo this first/second visit again, I would still walk. Haha! Yes yes I know, my legs would kill me, but I got so much more experience from walking. So why not?

Bicycle

Now I know I’ve said that I would prefer walking, but… …in hindsight, IF I had been to Singha Park many times, then my option of getting around the park would be definitely using a bicycle. Haha!

With the bike, I could cover more grounds, and quicker! Since I would have seen most of the attractions already, visiting the park would be more of a touch and go and less immersing. So it is really up to your personal preference on how you want to enjoy your visit.

The bikes were for rent at 150 Baht/hr for the tandem, 100 Baht/hr for the mountain bike and 50 Baht/hr for the children’s bike. There are various bike trails to choose from the information map which indicates the length of the ride in kilometres and level of difficulty for each trail. Do note that all cyclists are required to register at the bike desk before setting off on any trails in the park.

Tram

The tram ride carries visitors to key highlights of the park. From the entrance, to the orchards, to the blooming flowers, to the petting zoo and also the zip lining and wall climbing area. Tram tickets are sold at the information counter at the entrance. The pricing at 50 Baht for an adult and 25 Baht for a child. On busy periods, like the weekends, the wait time to board the tram may be longer, so do be prepared for that. Trams run at ½ hour intervals between 10 am and 5 pm. This is a definite family-friendly option if you are visiting Singha Park with children.

 

What you might experience?

We covered everything by foot (in roughly this order), minus the petting zoo and the zip lining/ wall climbing- we did not do those. So yeah, it is possible. You could totally do this by walking! Just remember we did have intervals of respite at restaurants etc. We were, after all not visiting Singha Park to torture ourselves. Haha!

1. Golden Singha Mascot (labelled #1 on the Singha Park’s map)

This salient golden Singha mascot kings over the entire open field at the entrance opposite the carpark. Because it would be the first and last icon every visitor would see, naturally it was an obligatory selfie/wefie shot for everyone! Haha! 😀 If you did not have your photo taken with this Singha mascot, then you have not been to Singha Park.

Want a little intimate time with just the Singha mascot and you in the photo? Either you arrive early in the morning or have your photo with it when the park is about to close at 6! Perfecto!

2. Sunflower Patch (labelled #2 on the Singha Park’s map)

This attraction is by far the one I would remember forever. On the official Singha Park’s map, it is close to #2 (near the swan lake).

I have never seen a sunflower field before. And yes, this is not exactly a huge sunflower field that stretches for hectares on end. But hey, I would take it gladly! I remember being so excited for it.

I was literally screaming with excitement and running towards it. It was actually quite hilarious. We spend quite a bit of time snapping photos and just being in awe for these sunflowers. They were just so perfect. The only thing that compelled us to move on was when the drizzle started, if not, we probably would have stayed longer. Haha! 😀

3. Swan Lake (labelled #2 on the Singha Park’s map)

So because the drizzle which started small, soon got a little heavier, we ran up the hill from the sunflower patch towards the swan lake. Unplanned for it all, we took shelter under a tree while we watched the swans oblivious of it all, and just minding their own business.

Wish I could be like them, would life be so must simpler and happier? 😉 There is a tint of peace just watching the swans and being in the drizzle; like your worries were nothing but a phase and they really don’t matter at all.

4. Bhu Bhirom Restaurant & Tea Plantation (labelled #3 on the Singha Park’s map)

We needed to respite for lunch and to take shelter from the heavy drizzle. In the far distance, we espied a building which looked like a place we could fuel up. And unplanned to even have lunch at the Bhu Bhirom Restaurant, we brisk walked our way there anyway!

I reckoned the food was good, because on both days we visited the park, we had our meals at the same restaurant! The first time we were there, we ordered shrimp pad thai, minced meat tofu, fried calamari rings and green tea latte. On the second visit we ordered much more! It was either we were ravenous or we just decided to splurge a little because the ambience was just so prefect and we just wanted to have a nice hearty meal! We had shrimp tom yum soup, fried chicken, beef fried rice, and fried calamari rings (yes, again)!

Since the weather was really lovely on our second visit to Singha Park, we requested to sit at the area with an unimpeded view of the tea plantation sprawled beneath us. With the gentle breeze brushing against our skin all so softy, and the air crisp, it was such an invigorating experience accompanying a picturesque expansive sight of the tea plantation indeed. Such an awesome meal with an amazing view. I really couldn’t ask for more.

Bhu Bhirom Restaurant which opens every day (11 am – 10 pm), not only serves North Thai specialities, they do have Western options. This place is imperatively worth a try!

5. Petting Zoo (labelled #6 on the Singha Park’s map)

This area probably attracts the young kids most. With the chance to get up close and personal with the animals such as the giraffes, cows, and zebras, I am sure it would be such a joy. You could have an opportunity to feed the animals too!

6. Barn House/ Farm Fest Area (labelled #5 on the Singha Park’s map)

This area is officially known as the Sports & Recreation Centre. To us, it is also known as the chillax café area. At the Farm Fest Area, there is a bike rental shed. You could also shop for merchandise and souvenirs. This area is also grounds for any Singha Park’s organised events like the Farm Festival On The Hill or the International Balloon Fiesta mentioned earlier.

Just opposite the shed is a quaint Barn House café! With the quiet ambience, the outdoor benches make chilling with a coffee and a cupcake really perfect! And with the cooling weather (at that time) to add into the mix, all just was in a cosmos! A prefect respite gem!

7. Zip Lining & Wall Climbing (labelled #7 on the Singha Park’s map)

For someone who is more intrigued by adventure, and has the budget for it, then this is the place for you.

Near the Barn House/ Farm Fest Area is the zip lining platform, which would give you the opportunity to have a panoramic view of the park and all its glorious tea planation. Alas, this zip lining experience is at a steep cost of 800 Baht per person. On the other hand, the rock wall climbing stands at 9 levels high which costs 150 Baht per person to have a try at it.

Unless you are into such activities and want to try it at least once, I reckon strolling or biking to immerse into the Singha Park’s ambience is really divine enough. Haha! 😀

 

TIPS?!

Go EARLY!

Because we didn’t know we wanted to spend so much time at the park, the first time we arrived at Singha Park was around lunch time or slightly later, and with the downpour that kept us stranded at Bhu Bhirom Restaurant, we really did not have much time to explore.

In hindsight, it is always nice to go earlier so you could really have a nice chill experience at the park! I am sure you would be kept very busy snapping photos as I did! 😀

Singha Park is a definite MUST-DO when in Chiang Rai. Duly thought through, the park is landscaped with bike trails, romantic lakes and meadows all making this a great attraction for locals and tourists!

So remember to Travel Whenever and have a nice stroll into the great beyond!

Dee

 

Route: End of Cradle Mountain Road (Circuit Jaunt)
Distance: 5.7 km (3.5 miles)
Average Walk Time: ~ 3.5 hours (with plenty of time to take great shots)
Difficulty: 🙂
Scenery: 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

 

How to get there?

Glacier Rock

Getting tangible with Dove Lake

Angular view of Cradle Mountain

Boatshed

Canoeing on Dove Lake

 

How to get there?

From our stay at Peppers Cradle Mountain Lodge, an approximately 15 – 20 minutes drive along Cradle Mountain Road, led us to the end, and marked the start of one of Tasmania’s premier walks- the Dove Lake Circuit Track!

(FYI, taking the free shuttle service can also bring you to Dove Lake, and this is advisable since parking spaces are limited. The frequency for these shuttle services are reasonable too.)

Upon arrival at the parking lot, the partial view of the cerulean waters of Dove Lake was enough to keep us enraptured for a moment or two. Not to mention the backdrop of the 2 leading spires of Cradle Mountain protruding high up against the sky. What a picturesque vista that no image captured on camera could ever do justice to. Seriously, you need to be there to see it in full view.

Hiking Highlights and Views

We were swooned as we got closer to the start of the circuit track, though the waters ain’t as blue as it was for view at the parking lot, it looked really clear, clean and super refreshing- to an extend that J and I wanted to douse ourselves inside for a refreshing late morning splash. It only we could… … We just might… …

Between the both of us, J was a tad excited than I was. She had done research on Cradle Mountain many months before we embarked on this odyssey, so she was extremely excited for this part of the entire Tasmanian vacation.

Since it’s a circular track, venturing from either side would be the same. However, we decided to start from the left, as that was what the signage stated. Very typical, I know.

 

Glacier Rock

After experiencing the walk (starting from the left), I suggest that everyone should do the same. WHY?

The initial part of the walk allowed us to spend an interminable amount of time up on the Glacier Rock taking pictures with natural late morning sunlight! Furthermore, we got to have an unobstructed view of Cradle Mountain, and a pseudo bird’s eye view of Dove Lake.

It was a perfect way to start off a walk, don’t you think?

If you looked closely at the surface of the Rock, you will see parallel grooves engraved into it caused by debris within the glacier that moved down from the slopes of Cradle Mountain many moons ago.

TIPS? Try to stay rooted to the uneven rock, and try not to plunge into the lake, though how inviting it may look. The tracks may be slippery too, so don’t get too carried away with photo takings that you accidentally plunge.

 

Getting tangible with Dove Lake

Walking on the boardwalks around the Lake led us to a mini outlet or two where we could sit by the sandy shore with the waters of Dove Lake just a pebble’s throw away. It was a great instant to stay serene with nature, and stare at the waters with the two spires in the far distance.

This was the moment where we all took a deep breath and wished time could just pause forever.

Since the waters was just within reach and all so alluring, I couldn’t resist not putting my hands in for a cold swirl. Hey, if I can’t douse my whole body in it, at least let my hands have a go at it, huh? 😀

 

Angular view of Cradle Mountain

Sauntering around the Lake gave us angular views of the 2 jutting spires of Cradle Mountain that ensorcelled us as we stood beneath. After awhile we came to realised the tons of photos of Cradle Mountain we had as the backdrop- viewed from different parts of Dove Lake. Haha… … 😀

A walk cannot be complete without admiration of the flowers that grow so perfectly along the boardwalk. And what about appreciating the little streams that trickle from the rainforest? Oh yes, what about the wildlife, insects and amphibians too? 😀

Nature is just beautiful like that. If we could spare some time to pause and absorb, we would be awe-stricken.

 

Boatshed

Another popular icon in many photographs of Dove Lake would be the boatshed that stands humbly by the shore of the Lake; with Cradle Mountain afar.

The boatshed was build mainly out of King Billy pine. It was built back in the 1930s, as boating was popular back then.

 

Canoeing on Dove Lake

Our stay- Peppers Cradle Mountain Lodge offers canoe trips on Dove Lake during Summer. It was pretty easy for us to enquire and book a slot with them upon our arrival at check-in.

The costs is not exactly cheap- it’s approximately AUS$80- ish? However, this trip provided by the Lodge, includes afternoon tea, life vests (not for keeping afterwards, of course), tips of how to manoeuvre the canoe, and a dash of insights of the Dove Lake area.

As we aren’t adept canoeist (I have never held a paddle before in my life), we weren’t so on the ball of things, and were actually behind the “class” in all tasks. It was mad hilarious. We were practically laughing our ass off during the entire 3.5 hours trip.

Let me describe to you in detail of what was actually happening, so any first-timers out there could be prepared and not face the same awkwardness as we did… … Haha…

You know the movie Dump & Dumper? The one where the pair was acting all weird, clumsy and goofy? Well, imagine them being girls, and younger.

When the rest of the “class” had already advanced further towards Glacier Rock and were there listening to the insights by the guides, we were still way behind struggling to join the pack. We were laughing half the time to even get the canoe to move, and when we did move, we were going in circles! It was seriously quite an embarrassing sight. LOL!

Finally we made it close to the Rock, but by that time, the guide had finished speaking and the “class” was ready to canoe to the next location.

This was after J tried to murder me (yes, she did) by canoeing us way too close to the Rock that had protruding sharp branches. By the time, I yelled for her to stop paddling and me trying to use the paddle to stop the canoe from advancing, the branch was already so close to me it slit my wrist a little during the mini struggle. Flies started fluttering in front of me for our canoe had perturbed their afternoon slumber. (-.-)”

Ah yes… …Definitely a Dump & Dumper moment. Don’t judge.

As J had done some really minor canoeing in Vietnam, of course I took the cue from her. Her miniscule experience in canoeing was our only asset to bring us through the 3.5 hours. Sounds like torture huh? But it was not, really. It was like a self-entertained sitcom. We did way too embarrassing things that tickled us silly. We saw ourselves being extremely way behind the “class” that it was pricelessly comical.

We were constantly reverent that the “class” could paddle like some sort of pro-athletes. Way to go people!

So I paddled when J instructed me to, and also stopped even when she wanted me NOT to. I was tired alright. I needed a break to embrace nature, leave me alone. LOL.

I felt real bad that I was at the front seat gawking at Cradle Mountain, and splashing the waters when she was at the back struggling to keep us on track with the class. So I offered to take over, with full on enthusiasm and energy thinking that I could paddle for at least awhile longer while J rested. But this determination lasted a few seconds, and in the end, we both weren’t paddling as we saw the “class” float into the horizon, while we were left at the centre of the Lake.

Okay, I exaggerated here. The guides aren’t that mean. When they saw as “liabilities” of the “class” stranded, they paddled back to get us and tied our canoe to theirs so we won’t be left behind! Hooray for the invention of ropes, seriously!

As they were tying the ropes, I could still remember I asked a very cheeky question- probably I was too tired to think straight.

“Yay. So, this is like a free pass right?”

“Oh no. You still have to paddle ya? Or we will all be here until sunset.”

After being tied to them, and knowing now there was no way we will be behind the pack, I spend most of the time playing with the waters by making mini waves with my hands as the canoe moved. J, on the other hand, was a “good student”. She paddled, and only took short pauses to rest.

For that, I would like to laud her. She has some serious determination when it comes to canoeing. You go girl!

As I was having my moment with the waters of Dove Lake, J was at the back reminding me to paddle. So trying not to be a freeloader, I mustered all my energy left in my arms, and paddled with all my might- which of course lasted for a few seconds. How feeble my arms are.

Okay people, I’ve tried. My arms just can’t. Make me walk for miles up slopes and down, but don’t make me canoe.

Would I want to experience this again? Sure! Why not? Not the part where J tried to murder me of course. The other parts of this are definitely good to relive. Haha…!

Since I was not the one doing most of the paddling (thank you J and the guides), and I could enjoy Cradle Mountain from a unique perspective. So why not? 😀 And not to mention all the laughs and embarrassing actions we did- I honestly don’t mind reliving them.

Life is all about new experiences and laughter, and so what if we “humiliated” ourselves in front of the “class” and guides? What matter most was that we had a ball of a time laughing at each other’s stupidity.

At least now I can tell people I have canoed before? Or does this not count? 😀

Hope this inspires you to insert new experiences in your life, embrace nature and travel whenever!

Dee